Found in Books – Another Weather Forecast

Today a friend of mine – a bibliophile like myself – was rummaging through my old books. I was trying to find the books that contain those old weather forecasts I wrote about some time ago, to show them off. I couldn’t find one of the books, which I seemed to have misplaced. (Don’t worry; I’ve since found it hidden in plain sight.) However, we did stumble upon another book, which, unbeknownst to me, contained another one of those forecasts by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute. This one is even a bit older, dating from December 14th, 1928.

Another old-style meteorological forecast, found in an old physics textbook.

Another old-style meteorological forecast, found in an old physics textbook.

It is another specimen of beautifully handwritten and hand-drawn, very detailed weather forecast from days past. What struck me in particular about this one was the way the weather was described, though. The meteorologist responsible for this day’s weather describes the struggle between areas of high and low pressure as if it were geopolitical history. In Dutch, (English translations below)

A wonderful description of the current state of the weather and the immediate predictions.

A wonderful description of the current state of the weather and the immediate predictions.

Terwijl het gebied van hoogen druk over ScandinaviĆ« nog een weinig toenam en zich Z.-waards over het Engelsch kanaal trachtte uit te breiden wordt de Oostrand van die Zuidpunt over ons land aangetast door dalingen voortgekomen uit de gisteren genoemde depressie over Oost-Duitschland – als gevolg waarvan de kans op sneeuwval toeneemt terwijl de Orkaandepressie haar invloed aan de W.-zijde over Ierland doet gelden. Vooralsnog behield de hooge druk daar nog de overhand doordat de zwaarste dalingen uit die Orkaandepressie zich naar de Golf van Biscaye verplaatsten.

English:

While the area of high pressure yet gained in strength over Scandinavia and attempted to expand itself across the English channel, the eastern edge of this southern tip is eroded over our country by descents that originated from the depression over East Germany mentioned yesterday – as a consequence of which the chance of snow increases, while the hurricane depression continues to exert its influence on the west side of Ireland. Up until now, high pressure had the upper hand there because the strongest descents from that hurricane depression moved to the Gulf of Biscaye.

Just lovely!

Marco is a theoretical (bio)physicist, currently engaged in unraveling the sequence-dependent dynamics of DNA molecules to earn his PhD at Leiden University. Other passions include literature and history.

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